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  Advanced Software   Technologies, Incorporated   8547 South Kostner Avenue   Chicago, Illinois 60652    Voice: (773) 948-4870      Fax: (773) 948-4874   E-Mail: sales@advsoftech.com
Welcome to ASTI
Are your current IT consultants meeting and/or exceeding all your company's IT challenges?

Call today for a quote and find out how ASTI can assist in meeting and/or exceeding your business's current IT challenges!


Our services include:


Installation:
ASTI has 28 years experience installing and upgrading multiple desktop and server platforms including Microsoft Windows / Advanced Server, Mac OSX, Novell, Unix, FreeBsd, Linux, SCO, IBM AIX, HP-UX



Support:
ASTI provides IT diagnostics/support for a wide array of IT systems.

Software: ASTI has extensive experience with many standard applications found on most computer systems and also many industry specific applications including those written in Micro focus Cobol, Accu-Cobol, Informix, Oracle, MySql, SQL , C, C++, PHP, JavaScript, CGI, FoxPro. In addition we also support the following server platforms: Microsoft Windows / Advanced Server, Samba, Novell, Unix, FreeBsd, Mac OSX, Linux, SCO, IBM AIX, HP-UX, and other legacy systems.

Hardware: ASTI can also provide hardware diagnostics and support. Everything from periodic maintenance to troubleshooting to component replacement.

Networking: ASTI can install/replace/upgrade network cabling/routers/switches. We excel at network diagnostics and tuning to increase local network performance and, in most cases, internet bandwidth.

Online Trouble Ticket System: where users can post service requests and track them to completion. Another side to having this system in place is that we can generate reports of equipment failures and other recurring events which can help to predict future failures and in turn help maintain system availability.

Programming:
Programming: Looking for a program that has not been written yet? ASTI has experience in most modern and many legacy programming languages including: Micro focus Cobol, Accu-Cobol, Informix, Oracle, MySql, SQL , C, C++, PHP, JavaScript, Java, CGI, Mobile Platforms (Android, Windows, iPhone), FoxPro, Business Basic, Dbase III/IV. Call ASTI for a free quote (773)948-4870

Administration:
Administration: ASTI offers customized service packages to meet your business?s dynamically changing challenges. Call ASTI for a free quote (773)948-4870

 
javascript JAVA Language oracle database cobol asynchronous JavaScript and XML system administrator Microsoft Windows informix PHP MySQL unix linux freebsd SAMBA C++ C language foxbase dbase novell

"javascript"
  From Wikipedia:
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'''JavaScript''' is a high-level, dynamic, untyped, and interpreted programming language. It has been standardized in the ECMAScript language specification. Alongside HTML and CSS, it is one of the three core technologies of World Wide Web content production; the majority of websites employ it and it is supported by all modern Web browsers without plug-ins. JavaScript is prototype-based with first-class functions, making it a multi-paradigm language, supporting object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. It has an API for working with text, arrays, dates and regular expressions, but does not include any I/O, such as networking, storage, or graphics facilities, relying for these upon the host environment in which it is embedded.

Although there are strong outward similarities between JavaScript and Java, including language name, syntax, and respective standard libraries, the two are distinct languages and differ greatly in their design. JavaScript was influenced by programming languages such as Self and Scheme.

JavaScript is also used in environments that are not Web-based, such as PDF documents, site-specific browsers, and desktop widgets. Newer and faster JavaScript virtual machines (VMs) and platforms built upon them have also increased the popularity of JavaScript for server-side Web applications. On the client side, JavaScript has been traditionally implemented as an interpreted language, but more recent browsers perform just-in-time compilation. It is also used in game development, the creation of desktop and mobile applications, and server-side network programming with runtime environments such as Node.js.

History

Beginnings at Netscape
JavaScript was originally developed in 10 days in May 1995 by Brendan Eich, while he was working for Netscape Communications Corporation. Indeed, while competing with Microsoft for user adoption of Web technologies and platforms, Netscape considered their client-server offering a distributed OS with a portable version of Sun Microsystems's Java providing an environment in which applets could be run. Because Java was a competitor of C++ and aimed at professional programmers, Netscape also wanted a lightweight interpreted language that would complement Java by appealing to nonprofessional programmers, like Microsoft's Visual Basic (see JavaScript and Java).

Although it was developed under the name '''Mocha''', the language was officially called '''LiveScript''' when it first shipped in beta releases of Netscape Navigator 2.0 in September 1995, but it was renamed JavaScript when it was deployed in the Netscape browser version 2.0B3.

The change of name from LiveScript to JavaScript roughly coincided with Netscape adding support for Java technology in its Netscape Navigator Web browser. The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new Web programming language.

There is a common misconception that the JavaScript language was influenced by an earlier Web page scripting language developed by Nombas named C-- (not to be confused with the later C-- created in 1997). Brendan Eich, however, had never heard of C-- before he created LiveScript. Nombas did pitch their embedded Web page scripting to Netscape, though Web page scripting was not a new concept, as shown by ViolaWWW. Nombas later switched to offering JavaScript instead of C-- in their ScriptEase product and was part of the TC39 group that standardized ECMAScript.

Server-side JavaScript
Netscape introduced an implementation of the language for server-side scripting with Netscape Enterprise Server in December, 1995, soon after releasing JavaScript for browsers.
Since the mid-2000s, there has been a resurgence of server-side JavaScript implementations, such as Node.js.

Adoption by Microsoft
Microsoft Windows script technologies including VBScript and JScript were released in 1996. JScript, a reverse-engineered implementation of Netscape's JavaScript, was released on July 16, 1996 and was part of Internet Explorer 3, as well as being available server-side in Internet Information Server. IE3 also included Microsoft's first support for Cascading Style Sheets and various extensions to HTML, but in each case the implementation was noticeably different to that found in Netscape Navigator at the time. These differences made it difficult for designers and programmers to make a single website work well in both browsers leading to the use of 'best viewed in Netscape' and 'best viewed in Internet Explorer' logos that characterised these early years of the browser wars. JavaScript began to acquire a reputation for being one of the roadblocks to a cross-platform and standards-driven Web. Some developers took on the difficult task of trying to make their sites work in both major browsers, but many could not afford the time.
Advanced Software Technologies, Incorporated • 8547 South Kostner Avenue • Chicago • IL • 60652 • Voice: (773) 948-4870 • Fax: (773) 948-4874